Records Request

Current and Former Students: Requesting Records and Records Transfer

If your child is no longer attending Fossil DLP and you would like a copy of their student file, records are stored electronically with Fossil DLP and can be ordered using this form. 

For students transferring out of Fossil DLP, please have the new school send a records request to Fossil DLP via email or fax. Records will be transferred once the central office has received the forwarded request from the school site.

Email Records Requests to: [email protected]

Fax Records Requests to: 541-763-2099

In the case of a student’s Special Education Records, it is required by law that such requests are treated urgently. All requests by school districts for students identified for Special Education services should be emailed to [email protected] for immediate assistance.

Former Students

Note: Former Fossil DLP students 18 years of age and older must request their records themselves unless legal documentation is provided allowing another adult to obtain records on their behalf. To request the records of a former Fossil DLP student, click here. You’ll be redirected to the online request form. Confirmation of requestor’s identification is required via upload of photo ID.

  • School Districts, Universities, Employers, and Verification Companies may request the records of a former student if a signed record release statement on organizational letterhead is provided alongside the request. 
  • Officers of the Court, Law Enforcement, and Social Services Organizations may request the records of a former student if the request is accompanied by legal documentation allowing Fossil DLP to release the record(s).
  • By law we have up to ten (10) business days to respond to your request.

What is FERPA?

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education.

FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are “eligible students.”

  • Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student’s education records maintained by the school. Schools are not required to provide copies of records unless, for reasons such as great distance, it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the records. Schools may charge a fee for copies.
  • Parents or eligible students have the right to request that a school correct records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading. If the school decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if the school still decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information.
  • Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student’s education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31):
    • School officials with legitimate educational interest;
    • Other schools to which a student is transferring;
    • Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;
    • Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;
    • Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school;
    • Accrediting organizations;
    • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;
    • Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and
    • State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law.
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